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Showing posts from September, 2020

Chess in the 80s 17: Theoretical Novelties (07/1988 & 03/1989)

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BtM 39A: Beat Gazza (Beat the Amateurs I)

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Position G, December 1988 White to play Kasparov - Wolff, New York Clock Simul 1988 Contributions to the comments box are welcome. I’ll reply with what the Masters have to say about their choice to anybody who suggests a move.

Beat the Masters 39 (Beat the Amateurs I)

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  December 1988, Position G White to play Today's position is a little different to every other Beat the Masters I've published so far.

Immersion 5: All Japanese All The Time

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Employers eh?   Strange bunch of chaps. They hire you to do a job and then they set about systematically putting obstacles in your way to ensure you can’t actually do that job. One day I must find out why they do it this way. All of which is my way of explaining that my month of immersion is much closer to coming to an end than I would have liked.

BtM 38A: Kingside or Queenside?

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  November 1988, Position G White to play Lahav - Y. Grunfeld, Tel Aviv 1988 Contributions to the comments box are welcome. I’ll reply with what the Masters have to say about their choice to anybody who suggests a move.

Beat the Masters 38

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  November 1988, Position G White to play

KMKY10: OUCH!

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Black to play A chesser walking into a stalemate from an overwhelming position is a bit like a batsman getting hit in the box. Just as painful and similarly musing to absolutely everybody save for the person on the receiving end.

Chess in the 80s 16: Speelman vs Short (11/1988)

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BtM 37A: Excelling II (Elements and Concepts)

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  October 1989, Position E White to play Shvidler - Levitt, Tel Aviv 1989 Contributions to the comments box are welcome. I’ll reply with what the Masters have to say about their choice to anybody who suggests a move.

Beat the Masters 37

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  October 1989, Position E White to play

Immersion 4: Week Three Report

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The big news of the week is Say Chess ’s new idea for a  Tactics Tracker  club. More of that later after I’ve had a moment to reflect on how going back to work has changed things.

BtM 36A: How to study openings

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  March 1989, Position G Black to play Fedorowicz - Dlugy, World Open 1988 Contributions to the comments box are welcome. I’ll reply with what the Masters have to say about their choice to anybody who suggests a move. Scroll down to see some commentary from me and the Masters’ feedback. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . If 'What Most People Do is Not the Way to Go'   ( KMKY 8 Nasty, Brutish and not Short ) is true, it counts double with regard to studying chess openings. All that theory out there, all those courses and all those videos … and yet most of us still suck when it comes to actually playing the game. There has to be another, better, way. I think there is. Or ways, plural, perhaps. One of the things we might do when it comes to studying the Sicilian Defence, say, is take 100 positions where … d5 is potentially on the cards, going through them one by one and deciding if Black should actually play it. More of that another day. For this post I want to look at anothe

Beat the Masters 36

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March 1989, Position G Black to play Contributions to the comments box are welcome. Masters’ feedback will be published tomorrow.

KMKY 9: Visualisation practice

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White to play Yusupov - Kasparov, Linares 1990 This, as you can see, is a position from one of Artur’s own games. He went on to lose but the game but he certainly went down fighting. If found it in Boost Your Chess, Chapter 9: The Use of Traps . Coincidentally it was the chapter turned out to be next on my list the day after I saw a tweet from Neal Bruce   talking about the importance of resilience in chess ... but that's only half the story.

Chess in the 80s 15: Dlugy Interview (11/1988)

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BtM 35A: 2800-level pedantry

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March 1989, Position F White to play Dlugy - Gurevich, World Open 1988 Contributions to the comments box are welcome. I’ll reply with what the Masters have to say about their choice to anybody who suggests a move. Scroll down to see some commentary from me and the Masters’ feedback. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Twitter There’s no pedant like a chess pedant. It’s what we do. Well that and play chess. When Matt (aka:  Why Must I Lose to This Idiot ) saw a silly quote on the twitter, he didn’t just decide that it was silly or agree with Kings Head Chess Club that it was silly he actually proved it was silly. Matt went off and found a tonne of games in which one side wins without ever moving backwards. He even dug up one from Unfeasibly Tall Coach To The World Champions Peter Heine Neilsen which lasted 55 moves. Top work. Dlugy - Gurevich, World Open 1988, however, doesn't make it into

Beat the Masters 35

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March 1989, Position F White to play Contributions to the comments box are welcome. Masters’ feedback will be published tomorrow.

Immersion 3: Week Two Report (Chessing vs Running)

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Good news.  Parkrun - a weekly free 5k run held at 700+ different locations in 20 countries around the world -   is coming back to Britain . Or maybe it isn’t . The clowns and jokers that constitute Her Majesty's Government continue to make a total fecking horlicks of COVID. Not a surprise, I suppose, but still hugely depressing. Still, it’s probably a good time to do Couch to 5k  again  anyway. It’s free, it’s proven effective and it gifts me a neat little lead in to a few thoughts on the difference between chess players and runners. What’s not to like?

BtM 34A: Excelling at Chess (Real Chess Players)

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  September 1989, Position E Black to play Neurohr - Niedermaier, Bundesliga 1988/89 Contributions to the comments box are welcome. I’ll reply with what the Masters have to say about their choice to anybody who suggests a move.

Beat the Masters 34

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  September 1989, Position E Black to play Contributions to the comments box are welcome. Masters’ feedback will be published tomorrow.

KMKY 8: Nasty, brutish and not short

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Do you want to get better a chess but find yourself at a loss for what to do because nobody agrees how to adults get better at this game of ours? If so, this post is for you.

Chess in the 80s 14: The World Open (10/1988)

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BtM 33A: Requiring original thought

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September 1989, Position D White to play Hansen - Piket, Munich 1989 Contributions to the comments box are welcome. I’ll reply with what the Masters have to say about their choice to anybody who suggests a move. Scroll down to see some commentary from me and the Masters’ feedback. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Today’s Beat the Masters position, the 130th I've looked at, is unique. It's the only one so far where one side has two queens. I’ve often had problems in positions which have or lead to material imbalances. [INSERT LIST HERE] In my own defence, even GM James Plaskett   found today’s BtM tricky. "… perhaps the most difficult position yet to appear in this competition" , was Jimbo’s opinion - and he was to be the British Champion the following year. Levitt (not then a GM but he would get the title in the mid-90s)’s take: "An unusual position requiring original thought since players have little or no experience with two queens." Which is certa